Located in the Village of Oaks, and convenient to Phoenixville and Collegeville, Snyder Family Chiropractic is dedicated to helping you achieve your state of well-being. Dr. Snyder's goal is to bring you better health and a better way of life by teaching and practicing the true principles of wellness chiropractic care. People from Phoenixville and Collegeville along with other surrounding areas who seek care at Snyder Family Chiropractic with Dr. Snyder are assured of receiving the finest quality care through the use of modern chiropractic equipment and technology and adjusting techniques. We have a genuine concern for your well-being!  ... View Profile
The chiropractic oath is a modern variation of the classical Hippocratic Oath historically taken by physicians and other healthcare professionals swearing to practice their professions ethically.[190] The American Chiropractic Association (ACA) has an ethical code "based upon the acknowledgement that the social contract dictates the profession's responsibilities to the patient, the public, and the profession; and upholds the fundamental principle that the paramount purpose of the chiropractic doctor's professional services shall be to benefit the patient."[191] The International Chiropractor's Association (ICA) also has a set of professional canons.[192]

After selling his very successful practice in Boise, Idaho, Dr. Tim Dudley moved to Whitefish in 2015 to pursue his professional goals of starting a consulting business to teach other Chiropractors how to be effective and successful. He also wanted to practice what he was preaching and set out to create his dream practice from the ground up. While Whitefish has many chiropractors, there was room for Dr. Dudley’s unique and highly specialized skill set here, and it also put he and his wife much closer to where they were both raised, and to their families. Once Dr. Dudley found his ideal office space in downtown Whitefish, he opened his doors and has been helping and healing one spine at a time.
How long does it take to build muscle with exercise? Performing particular exercises and eating the right foods can help to build muscle over time. In this article, we look in detail at how muscle builds up and long it will take. We also give you some ideas about the types of exercise and diet that can achieve this, as well as some tips on how to exercise safely. Read now
Chiropractic diagnosis may involve a range of methods including skeletal imaging, observational and tactile assessments, and orthopedic and neurological evaluation.[46] A chiropractor may also refer a patient to an appropriate specialist, or co-manage with another health care provider.[54] Common patient management involves spinal manipulation (SM) and other manual therapies to the joints and soft tissues, rehabilitative exercises, health promotion, electrical modalities, complementary procedures, and lifestyle advice.[3]
What is so good about an apple? Is it the color, ranging from ruby red to pale pink? Is it the crunch? The sweetness? Or is it, instead, a combination of all of these qualities, plus the natural goodness derived from the apple's secret ingredients — phytonutrients? If this were a multiple choice quiz, the answer would be "all of the above". Importantly, in addition to possessing numerous appealing physical qualities, apples contain an abundance of health-promoting biochemicals known as phytonutrients.1,2 These specific organic molecules are derived not only from apples but many other fresh fruits and vegetables, and help power the immune system, protect against cancer, maintain healthy eyes, and assist cells in clearing out metabolic waste products such as free radicals. ...
Vertebral subluxation, a core concept of traditional chiropractic, remains unsubstantiated and largely untested, and a debate about whether to keep it in the chiropractic paradigm has been ongoing for decades.[43] In general, critics of traditional subluxation-based chiropractic (including chiropractors) are skeptical of its clinical value, dogmatic beliefs and metaphysical approach. While straight chiropractic still retains the traditional vitalistic construct espoused by the founders, evidence-based chiropractic suggests that a mechanistic view will allow chiropractic care to become integrated into the wider health care community.[43] This is still a continuing source of debate within the chiropractic profession as well, with some schools of chiropractic still teaching the traditional/straight subluxation-based chiropractic, while others have moved towards an evidence-based chiropractic that rejects metaphysical foundings and limits itself to primarily neuromusculoskeletal conditions.[44][45]
“First of all, make sure your chiropractor is teaching you along with treating you,” says Dr. Jake LaVere, LaVere Performance Labs and Chiropractic. You want to make sure you’re educated and proactive in your treatment plan, working alongside your chiropractor to find a solution that will work for you. This will help you from both a preventative standpoint, as well as identifying when you’re in pain and what to do about it.

There are many possible signs of spinal cord trouble in the neck,8 with or without neck pain, mostly affecting the limbs in surprisingly vague ways that can have other causes: poor hand coordination; weakness, “heavy” feelings, and atrophy; diffuse numbness; shooting pains in the limbs (especially when bending the head forward); an awkward gait. Sometimes people have both neck pain and more remote symptoms without realizing they are related.


We integrate Chiropractic, Physical Therapy and Functional Medicine to find the cause of your problem and help remove it. Dr. Knight's unique method combines a system of traditional Chiropractic adjustments along with a customized exercise or daily activities program designed to enhance the adjustments for greater overall effectiveness. Creating for you specialized techniques to provide relief from your worst symptoms and discover the root cause of your concerns. His initial program is intensified to derive the greatest potential for improvement within the shortest amount of time. By targeting specific areas of your spine, chiropractic care h ... View Profile
Dr. V.J. Maddio is a Helena native. He attended Montana Statev1173c.jpg University on a wrestling scholarship and studied five years of Associated Sciences with an emphasis in Exercise/Physiology and Sports Medicine. He graduated with his degree in chiropractic from Northwestern College of Health Sciences in Bloomington, MN. Dr. Maddio began his own practice in Helena, Montana in January of 1992. He and his wife, Maureen, have enjoyed raising their 3 children in the Helena community. He is involved in several community activities ranging from youth sports to service organizations. Dr. Maddio is certified in Active Release Technique (ART), is a Certified Impairment Evaluator in the State of Montana, currently serves on the the Board of Chiropractors for the State of Montana, and is past President of the Montana Chiropractic Association.
A 2012 systematic review suggested that the use of spine manipulation in clinical practice is a cost-effective treatment when used alone or in combination with other treatment approaches.[160] A 2011 systematic review found evidence supporting the cost-effectiveness of using spinal manipulation for the treatment of sub-acute or chronic low back pain; the results for acute low back pain were insufficient.[11]
The best way to live with neck pain is to try to prevent it. The best things you can do to prevent neck pain are pay attention to your body, exercise, eat right, and maintain a healthy life style. In addition, do not sit at the computer for hours without getting up frequently to stretch the neck and back. Take the stress of the day out of your neck muscles and do your exercise routine. If you smoke, stop. Smoking is a predisposing factor for neck pain. If you are overweight, try to increase your activity level and eat healthier to get into shape.

Chiropractic has seen considerable controversy and criticism.[25][26] Although D.D. and B.J. were "straight" and disdained the use of instruments, some early chiropractors, whom B.J. scornfully called "mixers", advocated the use of instruments.[23] In 1910, B.J. changed course and endorsed X-rays as necessary for diagnosis; this resulted in a significant exodus from the Palmer School of the more conservative faculty and students.[23] The mixer camp grew until by 1924 B.J. estimated that only 3,000 of the U.S.'s 25,000 chiropractors remained straight.[23] That year, B.J.'s invention and promotion of the neurocalometer, a temperature-sensing device, was highly controversial among B.J.'s fellow straights. By the 1930s, chiropractic was the largest alternative healing profession in the U.S.[23]


Neck pain is commonly associated with dull aching. Sometimes pain in the neck is worsened with movement of the neck or turning the head. Other symptoms associated with some forms of neck pain include numbness, tingling, tenderness, sharp shooting pain, fullness, difficulty swallowing, pulsations, swishing sounds in the head, dizziness or lightheadedness, and lymph node (gland) swelling.

Attached to the back of each vertebral body is an arch of bone that forms a continuous hollow longitudinal space, which runs the whole length of the back. This space, called the spinal canal, is the area through which the spinal cord and nerve bundles pass. The spinal cord is bathed in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and surrounded by three protective layers called the meninges (dura, arachnoid and pia mater).
DCs may assess patients through clinical examination, laboratory testing, diagnostic imaging and other diagnostic interventions to determine when chiropractic treatment is appropriate or when it is not appropriate. Chiropractors will readily refer patients to the appropriate health care provider when chiropractic care is not suitable for the patient’s condition, or the condition warrants co-management in conjunction with other health care providers. 
Jump up ^ Weeks, William B; Goertz, Christine M; Meeker, William C; Marchiori, Dennis M (2015-01-01). "Public Perceptions of Doctors of Chiropractic: Results of a National Survey and Examination of Variation According to Respondents' Likelihood to Use Chiropractic, Experience With Chiropractic, and Chiropractic Supply in Local Health Care Markets". Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics. 38 (8): 533–44. doi:10.1016/j.jmpt.2015.08.001. PMID 26362263.
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Serious research to test chiropractic theories did not begin until the 1970s, and is continuing to be hampered by antiscientific and pseudoscientific ideas that sustained the profession in its long battle with organized medicine.[37] By the mid 1990s there was a growing scholarly interest in chiropractic, which helped efforts to improve service quality and establish clinical guidelines that recommended manual therapies for acute low back pain.[37] In recent decades chiropractic gained legitimacy and greater acceptance by medical physicians and health plans, and enjoyed a strong political base and sustained demand for services.[21] However, its future seemed uncertain: as the number of practitioners grew, evidence-based medicine insisted on treatments with demonstrated value, managed care restricted payment, and competition grew from massage therapists and other health professions.[21] The profession responded by marketing natural products and devices more aggressively, and by reaching deeper into alternative medicine and primary care.[21]
There is a wide range of ways to measure treatment outcomes.[91] Chiropractic care, like all medical treatment, benefits from the placebo response.[92] It is difficult to construct a trustworthy placebo for clinical trials of spinal manipulative therapy (SMT), as experts often disagree about whether a proposed placebo actually has no effect.[93] The efficacy of maintenance care in chiropractic is unknown.[12]
One of the reasons I wanted to visit the chiropractor was to take a more active role in my overall health and wellness. I specifically chose an integrated clinic, which offered not only chiropractic care, but also physical therapy, massage therapy and nutrition consultation. We discussed the addition of multi-vitamins, fish oil and vitamin D to my wellness plan. One thing I learned through this wellness planning? Everyone’s health journey is different! Since health is personal, your approach should be tailored to your specific needs. My focus on an integrated clinic may not be right for you, but I found value in being educated about all the options available to me.
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