Dr. Alexandra (Alex) Robins holds both BS and DC degrees, graduating from National College of Chiropractic in 1991. She practiced in Chicago for a couple of years before buying a practice in Indianapolis in1993, which focused on neuromusculoskeletal conditions as well as acupuncture. After 21 years of practice in Indianapolis, Dr. Robins closed her office and became involved with The Joint in 2016. As Dr. Robins states, “Being with The Joint has provided me with a wonderful opportunity to once again treat patients.”
Chiropractic treatment of the back, neck, limbs, and involved joints has become more accepted as a result of research and changing attitudes about additional approaches to healthcare. As a result, chiropractors are increasingly working with other healthcare workers, such as physicians and physical therapists, through referrals and complementary care.
The word “Chiropractic” is derived from the Greek words “cheir” (hand) and “praktos” (done) combined to mean “done by hand.” It was chosen by the developer of chiropractic care, Daniel David Palmer. In 1895, D.D. Palmer performed a chiropractic adjustment on a partially deaf janitor, Harvey Lillard, who later reported that his hearing had improved due to the change.
I finally met the chiropractor! We started out by talking a little about the reason for my visit, and what my goals were. Next, he performed a Selective Functional Movement Assessment, which basically helps the chiropractor find the root and cause of any symptoms—they do this by breaking down dysfunctional patterns logically rather than simply finding the obvious source of the pain.
Physical therapy / exercise: For most neck pain, we recommend a nearly normal schedule from the onset. Physical therapy can help you return to full activity as soon as possible and prevent re-injury. Physical therapists will show proper lifting and walking techniques, and exercises to strengthen and stretch your neck, arms, and abdominal muscles. Massage, ultrasound, diathermy, heat, and traction may also be recommended for short periods. People may also benefit from yoga, chiropractic manipulation, and acupuncture.
Sharp neck pain is not in itself a red flag. Believe it or not there is no common worrisome cause of neck pain that is indicated by a sharp quality. In fact, oddly, sharp pains are actually a bit reassuring, despite how they feel. In isolation — with no other obvious problem — they usually indicate that you just have a temporary, minor source of irritation in the cervical spine. Serious causes of neck pain like infections, tumours, and spinal cord problems tend grind you down with throbbing pains, not “stab” you.
Whats to know about radiculopathy? Radiculopathy describes a nerve being pinched by the spine. This can cause discomfort, weakness, and numbness, and can be treated with medication and physical therapy. This article explains the causes of this painful condition, how it is diagnosed, and how a person might go about preventing the onset of radiculopathy. Read now
Our shoulder joints have the greatest range of motion of any of the musculoskeletal joints in our bodies. The shoulder joint is really two joints, the glenohumeral joint between the arm bone (humerus) and the shoulder blade (scapula) and the acromioclavicular joint between the acromion (a bony projection off the scapula) and the collarbone (clavicle). The glenohumeral joint is a ball-and-socket joint and the acromioclavicular joint is a gliding joint. ...

The next area we tackled was my pelvis. I suffer from pelvic torsion, which means that one side of my hip is more rotated than the other. This can be caused by driving (one foot is in front of the other) or even the way you sit (I sit cross-legged a lot). Because my joints are misaligned and stiff, that can cause the nerve impulse not to get to my glute muscles quick enough.

One of the most common and well known therapeutic procedures performed by doctors of chiropractic is spinal manipulation (sometimes referred to as a "chiropractic adjustment"). The purpose of spinal manipulation is to restore joint mobility by manually applying a controlled force into joints that have become hypomobile – or restricted in their movement – as a result of a tissue injury. Tissue injury can be caused by a single traumatic event, such as improper lifting of a heavy object, or through repetitive stresses, such as sitting in an awkward position with poor spinal posture for an extended period of time. In either case, injured tissues undergo physical and chemical changes that can cause inflammation, pain, and diminished function for an individual. Manipulation, or adjustment of the affected joint and tissues, restores mobility, thereby alleviating pain and muscle tightness, allowing tissues to heal.
A personal worry example One day I became convinced that the terrible stubborn pain in my neck had to be a cancer. It was one of the lowest moments of my life. The pain had been escalating slowly for months, and eventually it got so severe and unrelenting that I lost my cool. But then, after an emergency massage appointment, I felt almost completely better…and that particular pain never bothered me again.
Some symptoms associated with neck pain could indicate the health of a nerve root or the spinal cord is at risk, or perhaps there is an underlying disease or infection. These symptoms can include radiating pain, tingling, numbness, or weakness into the shoulders, arm, or hands; neurological problems with balance, walking, coordination, or bladder and bowel control; fever or chills; and other troublesome symptoms.
Other. A 2012 systematic review found insufficient low bias evidence to support the use of spinal manipulation as a therapy for the treatment of hypertension.[120] A 2011 systematic review found moderate evidence to support the use of manual therapy for cervicogenic dizziness.[121] There is very weak evidence for chiropractic care for adult scoliosis (curved or rotated spine)[122] and no scientific data for idiopathic adolescent scoliosis.[123] A 2007 systematic review found that few studies of chiropractic care for nonmusculoskeletal conditions are available, and they are typically not of high quality; it also found that the entire clinical encounter of chiropractic care (as opposed to just SM) provides benefit to patients with cervicogenic dizziness, and that the evidence from reviews is negative, or too weak to draw conclusions, for a wide variety of other nonmusculoskeletal conditions, including ADHD/learning disabilities, dizziness, high blood pressure, and vision conditions.[124] Other reviews have found no evidence of significant benefit for asthma,[125][126] baby colic,[127][128] bedwetting,[129] carpal tunnel syndrome,[130] fibromyalgia,[131] gastrointestinal disorders,[132] kinetic imbalance due to suboccipital strain (KISS) in infants,[127][133] menstrual cramps,[134] insomnia,[135] postmenopausal symptoms,[135] or pelvic and back pain during pregnancy.[136] As there is no evidence of effectiveness or safety for cervical manipulation for baby colic, it is not endorsed.[137]
Dr. Sheridan Jones is also a graduate of Northwestern Health Sciences University, finishing his Doctorate of Chiropractic degree in 2007. Before attending Northwestern, he was enrolled in Carroll College where he studied Biology and was a member of the Fighting Saints football team. He is a certified Titleist Performance Institute medical professional which focuses on the evaluation and treatment of golf related injuries and performance issues. Dr. Jones is also a certified Graston Technique provider that implements a unique, instrument assisted soft tissue therapy for muscular injuries and chronic conditions that are traditionally difficult to treat or have failed with other treatment options. He lives in Helena with his wife, Tara, and enjoys everything outdoors - especially football, golf, hunting, boating and skiing.
Qaseem, A., Wilt, T. J., McLean, R. M., & Forciea, M. A. (2017, April 4). Noninvasive treatments for acute, subacute, and chronic low back pain: A clinical practice guideline from the American College of Physicians. Annals of Internal Medicine, 166(7), 514–530. Retrieved from http://annals.org/aim/fullarticle/2603228/noninvasive-treatments-acute-subacute-chronic-low-back-pain-clinical-practice
Are you looking for a Philadelphia chiropractor? Are you suffering from daily pain or have been injured in an auto accident, in sports, in your garden or at work? Dr. Paul Rubin and Philadelphia Chiropractic can help you finally put a stop to aggravated pain, so you can sleep better, feel younger and be able to participate in the activities you enjoy. Philadelphia Chiropractic is a chiropractic clinic located in downtown Philadelphia in Center City. We look forward to helping you live a more active and healthy lifestyle with gentle, personalized rehabilitation and effective, lasting pain relief. ... View Profile
There are seven vertebrae that are the bony building blocks of the spine in the neck (the cervical vertebrae) that surround the spinal cord and canal. Between these vertebrae are discs, and nearby pass the nerves of the neck. Within the neck, structures include the skin, neck muscles, arteries, veins, lymph nodes, thyroid gland, parathyroid glands, esophagus, larynx, and trachea. Diseases or conditions that affect any of these tissues of the neck can lead to neck pain.

Before I left, the office gave me a cold pack to use in case of any soreness. I didn’t have a need to use it, but everyone is different. “A cold pack can be a great tool to add to your wellness toolkit, since it can help control soreness, bruising and inflammation,” says Dr. Greg Doer, DC. Plus, it doesn’t just come in handy after a chiropractic adjustment. You can reuse it again and again.

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