Advanced Back & Neck Pain Center has been providing chiropractic services and treatment to the Newark, Delaware and surrounding areas since 1986. Under the guidance of founder, Dr. Richard McKay, the office has become synonymous with high level, affordable and efficient chiropractic care and pain management services that do not require the application of medications and/or surgery. Over the past five years, Dr. Richard McKay’s son, Dr. Travis McKay, has become an integral part of the practice and has taken over the role as clinical director of treatment. Together, the two Dr. McKay’s have established a treatment paradigm that ... View Profile
One of the most common concerns about the neck that is not especially worrisome: signs of “wear and tear” on the cervical spine, arthritis, and degenerative disc disease, as revealed by x-ray, CT scans, and MRI. Many people who have clear signs of arthritic degeneration in their spines will never have any symptoms, or only minor, and/or not for a long time.10 For instance, about 50% of fortysomethings have clinically silent disk bulges, and even at age 20 there’s a surprising amount of spinal arthritis. The seriousness of these signs is routinely overestimated by patients and healthcare professionals alike.11
Some skin problems on the neck can cause neck pain, but are usually obvious — most people will identify them as “skin problems on the neck” and not “a neck problem affecting the skin.” Herpes zoster (shingles) [CDC] causes a painful rash, cellulitis [Mayo] is extremely painful but superficial, and a carbuncle[Wikipedia] … well, it’s just a super zit, basically. If you can’t diagnose that one on your own, I can’t help you!

Spinal manipulation is associated with frequent, mild and temporary adverse effects,[14][138] including new or worsening pain or stiffness in the affected region.[139] They have been estimated to occur in 33% to 61% of patients, and frequently occur within an hour of treatment and disappear within 24 to 48 hours;[13] adverse reactions appear to be more common following manipulation than mobilization.[140] The most frequently stated adverse effects are mild headache, soreness, and briefly elevated pain fatigue.[141] Chiropractic is correlated with a very high incidence of minor adverse effects.[4] Chiropractic are more commonly associated with serious related adverse effects than other professionals following manipulation.[17] Rarely,[46] spinal manipulation, particularly on the upper spine, can also result in complications that can lead to permanent disability or death; these can occur in adults[14] and children.[142] There is a case of a three-month-old dying following manipulation of the neck area.[137] Estimates vary widely for the incidence of these complications,[13] and the actual incidence is unknown, due to high levels of underreporting and to the difficulty of linking manipulation to adverse effects such as stroke, which is a particular concern.[14] Adverse effects are poorly reported in recent studies investigating chiropractic manipulations.[143] A 2016 systematic review concludes that the level of reporting is unsuitable and unacceptable.[144] Reports of serious adverse events have occurred, resulting from spinal manipulation therapy of the lumbopelvic region.[145] Estimates for serious adverse events vary from 5 strokes per 100,000 manipulations to 1.46 serious adverse events per 10 million manipulations and 2.68 deaths per 10 million manipulations, though it was determined that there was inadequate data to be conclusive.[13] Several case reports show temporal associations between interventions and potentially serious complications.[146] The published medical literature contains reports of 26 deaths since 1934 following chiropractic manipulations and many more seem to remain unpublished.[17]
A 2006 systematic cost-effectiveness review found that the reported cost-effectiveness of spinal manipulation in the United Kingdom compared favorably with other treatments for back pain, but that reports were based on data from clinical trials without sham controls and that the specific cost-effectiveness of the treatment (as opposed to non-specific effects) remains uncertain.[161] A 2005 American systematic review of economic evaluations of conservative treatments for low back pain found that significant quality problems in available studies meant that definite conclusions could not be drawn about the most cost-effective intervention.[162] The cost-effectiveness of maintenance chiropractic care is unknown.[12]
Reviews of research studies within the chiropractic community have been used to generate practice guidelines outlining standards that specify which chiropractic treatments are "legitimate" (i.e. supported by evidence) and conceivably reimbursable under managed care health payment systems.[70] Evidence-based guidelines are supported by one end of an ideological continuum among chiropractors; the other end employs antiscientific reasoning and makes unsubstantiated claims.[2][52][43][85][86] Chiropractic remains at a crossroads, and that in order to progress it would need to embrace science; the promotion by some for it to be a cure-all was both "misguided and irrational".[87] A 2007 survey of Alberta chiropractors found that they do not consistently apply research in practice, which may have resulted from a lack of research education and skills.[88]

Dr. V.J. Maddio is a Helena native. He attended Montana Statev1173c.jpg University on a wrestling scholarship and studied five years of Associated Sciences with an emphasis in Exercise/Physiology and Sports Medicine. He graduated with his degree in chiropractic from Northwestern College of Health Sciences in Bloomington, MN. Dr. Maddio began his own practice in Helena, Montana in January of 1992. He and his wife, Maureen, have enjoyed raising their 3 children in the Helena community. He is involved in several community activities ranging from youth sports to service organizations. Dr. Maddio is certified in Active Release Technique (ART), is a Certified Impairment Evaluator in the State of Montana, currently serves on the the Board of Chiropractors for the State of Montana, and is past President of the Montana Chiropractic Association.

Vertebrobasilar artery stroke (VAS) is statistically associated with chiropractic services in persons under 45 years of age,[147] but it is similarly associated with general practitioner services, suggesting that these associations are likely explained by preexisting conditions.[146][148] Weak to moderately strong evidence supports causation (as opposed to statistical association) between cervical manipulative therapy (CMT) and VAS.[149] There is insufficient evidence to support a strong association or no association between cervical manipulation and stroke.[15] While the biomechanical evidence is not sufficient to support the statement that CMT causes cervical artery dissection (CD), clinical reports suggest that mechanical forces have a part in a substantial number of CDs and the majority of population controlled studies found an association between CMT and VAS in young people.[150] It is strongly recommended that practitioners consider the plausibility of CD as a symptom, and people can be informed of the association between CD and CMT before administrating manipulation of the cervical spine.[150] There is controversy regarding the degree of risk of stroke from cervical manipulation.[15] Many chiropractors state that, the association between chiropractic therapy and vertebral arterial dissection is not proven.[17] However, it has been suggested that the causality between chiropractic cervical manipulation beyond the normal range of motion and vascular accidents is probable[17] or definite.[16] There is very low evidence supporting a small association between internal carotid artery dissection and chiropractic neck manipulation.[151] The incidence of internal carotid artery dissection following cervical spine manipulation is unknown.[152] The literature infrequently reports helpful data to better understand the association between cervical manipulative therapy, cervical artery dissection and stroke.[153] The limited evidence is inconclusive that chiropractic spinal manipulation therapy is not a cause of intracranial hypotension.[154] Cervical intradural disc herniation is very rare following spinal manipulation therapy.[155]
Welcome to Harrisburg Chiropractic located in Harrisburg. At Harrisburg Chiropractic we strive to give you an experience that focuses on a person’s individual needs and wants. Whether your goal is the ability to pick up your children, sit at your desk, go for a walk or play a round of golf without pain, our clinic is the place for you. You may be interested in achieving optimal health and Harrisburg chiropractor Andrew Segarra wants you to utilize us as a resource in getting there.
Jump up ^ Jansen MJ, Viechtbauer W, Lenssen AF, Hendriks EJ, de Bie RA (2011). "Strength training alone, exercise therapy alone, and exercise therapy with passive manual mobilisation each reduce pain and disability in people with knee osteoarthritis: a systematic review". J Physiother. 57 (1): 11–20. doi:10.1016/S1836-9553(11)70002-9. PMID 21402325.

Dr. Bruce attended Harvey Mudd College prior to enrolling in Life Chiropractic College.  Following graduation in 1986, he worked as an associate for Dr. James Reed in Tucker, GA and later purchased the practice.  After 20 years as a solo practitioner, he relocated to Columbus, GA to work for Brodwyn and Associates.  After 6 years in Columbus, he joined Arrowhead Clinic in Hinesville in order to be closer to the beach.  Dr. Bruce has postgraduate training in Personal Injury, posture analysis and extremity care.  While in Tucker and Columbus, he was very involved in the community and served as the team chiropractor for numerous sports teams in the area.
Dr. Michael Morris graduated from Malta High School in 1997profess_pic.jpg, then attended Carroll College and had the honor of being part of the Saints football team. In 2002 he obtained his Bachelors of Arts Degree from Carroll and was accepted to Chiropractic College at Northwestern Health Sciences University in Bloomington, MN. In August of 2007, he graduated with his Chiropractic Degree and relocated back to Helena to work at Town Center Chiropractic. Both he and his wife are Montana natives and together they have 4 children. We look forward to helping you realize the benefits of chiropractic care.
Chiropractic is a form of alternative medicine mostly concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of mechanical disorders of the musculoskeletal system, especially the spine.[1][2] Proponents claim that such disorders affect general health via the nervous system,[2] through vertebral subluxation, claims which are demonstrably false. The main chiropractic treatment technique involves manual therapy, especially spinal manipulation therapy (SMT), manipulations of other joints and soft tissues.[3] Its foundation is at odds with mainstream medicine, and chiropractic is sustained by pseudoscientific ideas such as subluxation and "innate intelligence" that reject science.[4][5][6][7][8] Chiropractors are not medical doctors.[9]
Chiropractic care can be an essential part of a pain management plan. By working closely with your pain specialist or primary care doctor, a chiropractor can help you realign your spine to support a strong, healthy body. One of the most difficult parts of receiving chiropractic care, however, is locating a really great and well-qualified chiropractor near you. This can be daunting. Simply going online to find a list of names doesn’t help you to know if the chiropractor you choose is going to work for you, right? There are some easy steps to take, however, when asking “how to find a chiropractor near me?” And by taking these steps, we promise you can find a chiropractor who can help you relieve your pain and get back to your life.
After my adjustment, I was seen by a exercise therapist who walked me through a series of exercises to help with my pelvic rotation and weak glute muscles. Chiropractic adjustments combined with an exercise program can be an effective solution for treating sore muscles and joints. Want to try a few of the exercises I did at home? You’ll need a foam roller, an exercise ball and a flexible mini ball.
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