Early chiropractors believed that all disease was caused by interruptions in the flow of innate intelligence, a vitalistic nervous energy or life force that represented God's presence in man; chiropractic leaders often invoked religious imagery and moral traditions.[23] D.D. Palmer said he "received chiropractic from the other world".[24] D.D. and B.J. both seriously considered declaring chiropractic a religion, which might have provided legal protection under the U.S. constitution, but decided against it partly to avoid confusion with Christian Science.[23][216] Early chiropractors also tapped into the Populist movement, emphasizing craft, hard work, competition, and advertisement, aligning themselves with the common man against intellectuals and trusts, among which they included the American Medical Association (AMA).[23]
Dr. Alexandra (Alex) Robins holds both BS and DC degrees, graduating from National College of Chiropractic in 1991. She practiced in Chicago for a couple of years before buying a practice in Indianapolis in1993, which focused on neuromusculoskeletal conditions as well as acupuncture. After 21 years of practice in Indianapolis, Dr. Robins closed her office and became involved with The Joint in 2016. As Dr. Robins states, “Being with The Joint has provided me with a wonderful opportunity to once again treat patients.”
Doctors of Chiropractic (DCs) – often referred to as chiropractors or chiropractic physicians – practice a hands-on, drug-free approach to health care that includes patient examination, diagnosis and treatment. Chiropractors have broad diagnostic skills and are also trained to recommend therapeutic and rehabilitative exercises, as well as to provide nutritional, dietary and lifestyle counseling. 
Symptoms caused by spinal cord trouble are called “myelopathy.” And there are a lot of possible symptoms: it depends on which part of the spinal cord is affected. And many of them can have other causes. And it may worsen slowly and erratically over long periods. You can’t really confirm a myelopathy diagnosis without professional help, so please consult a doctor if you’re suspicious. BACK TO TEXT
Radiculopathy. A 2013 systematic review and meta-analysis found a statistically significant improvement in overall recovery from sciatica following SM, when compared to usual care, and suggested that SM may be considered.[101] There is moderate quality evidence to support the use of SM for the treatment of acute lumbar radiculopathy[102] and acute lumbar disc herniation with associated radiculopathy.[103] There is low or very low evidence supporting SM for chronic lumbar spine-related extremity symptoms and cervical spine-related extremity symptoms of any duration and no evidence exists for the treatment of thoracic radiculopathy.[102]
Headache. A 2011 systematic review found evidence that suggests that chiropractic SMT might be as effective as propranolol or topiramate in the prevention of migraine headaches.[110] A 2011 systematic review found evidence that does not support the use of SM for the treatment of migraine headaches.[111] A 2006 review found no rigorous evidence supporting SM or other manual therapies for tension headache.[112] A 2005 review found that the evidence was weak for effectiveness of chiropractic manipulation for tension headache, and that it was probably more effective for tension headache than for migraine.[113] A 2004 Cochrane review found evidence that suggests SM may be effective for migraine, tension headache and cervicogenic headache.[114]

Chiropractic's origins lie in the folk medicine of bonesetting,[4] and as it evolved it incorporated vitalism, spiritual inspiration and rationalism.[30] Its early philosophy was based on deduction from irrefutable doctrine, which helped distinguish chiropractic from medicine, provided it with legal and political defenses against claims of practicing medicine without a license, and allowed chiropractors to establish themselves as an autonomous profession.[30] This "straight" philosophy, taught to generations of chiropractors, rejects the inferential reasoning of the scientific method,[30] and relies on deductions from vitalistic first principles rather than on the materialism of science.[31] However, most practitioners tend to incorporate scientific research into chiropractic,[30] and most practitioners are "mixers" who attempt to combine the materialistic reductionism of science with the metaphysics of their predecessors and with the holistic paradigm of wellness.[31] A 2008 commentary proposed that chiropractic actively divorce itself from the straight philosophy as part of a campaign to eliminate untestable dogma and engage in critical thinking and evidence-based research.[32]
Chiropractic care (also simply “chiropractic”) is a health care discipline that emphasizes the inherent power of the body to heal itself without the use of drugs or surgery. It focuses on the relationship between the body’s structure (primarily the spine) and function (as coordinated by the nervous system) and how that relationship affects the preservation and restoration of health. When appropriate, doctors of chiropractic work in cooperation with the patient’s other health care practitioners.
Welcome to The Joint Chiropractic - Fayetteville! As your Fayetteville chiropractor dedicated to family chiropractic and spine health, we invite you to join the millions of Americans who have not only found relief from lower back pain, sciatica pain, and migraines, but also a pathway to wellness with chiropractic's natural, drug-free approach to healthcare.
DCs may assess patients through clinical examination, laboratory testing, diagnostic imaging and other diagnostic interventions to determine when chiropractic treatment is appropriate or when it is not appropriate. Chiropractors will readily refer patients to the appropriate health care provider when chiropractic care is not suitable for the patient’s condition, or the condition warrants co-management in conjunction with other health care providers. 

Before I left, the office gave me a cold pack to use in case of any soreness. I didn’t have a need to use it, but everyone is different. “A cold pack can be a great tool to add to your wellness toolkit, since it can help control soreness, bruising and inflammation,” says Dr. Greg Doer, DC. Plus, it doesn’t just come in handy after a chiropractic adjustment. You can reuse it again and again.
Dr. V.J. Maddio is a Helena native. He attended Montana Statev1173c.jpg University on a wrestling scholarship and studied five years of Associated Sciences with an emphasis in Exercise/Physiology and Sports Medicine. He graduated with his degree in chiropractic from Northwestern College of Health Sciences in Bloomington, MN. Dr. Maddio began his own practice in Helena, Montana in January of 1992. He and his wife, Maureen, have enjoyed raising their 3 children in the Helena community. He is involved in several community activities ranging from youth sports to service organizations. Dr. Maddio is certified in Active Release Technique (ART), is a Certified Impairment Evaluator in the State of Montana, currently serves on the the Board of Chiropractors for the State of Montana, and is past President of the Montana Chiropractic Association.
Vertebrobasilar artery stroke (VAS) is statistically associated with chiropractic services in persons under 45 years of age,[147] but it is similarly associated with general practitioner services, suggesting that these associations are likely explained by preexisting conditions.[146][148] Weak to moderately strong evidence supports causation (as opposed to statistical association) between cervical manipulative therapy (CMT) and VAS.[149] There is insufficient evidence to support a strong association or no association between cervical manipulation and stroke.[15] While the biomechanical evidence is not sufficient to support the statement that CMT causes cervical artery dissection (CD), clinical reports suggest that mechanical forces have a part in a substantial number of CDs and the majority of population controlled studies found an association between CMT and VAS in young people.[150] It is strongly recommended that practitioners consider the plausibility of CD as a symptom, and people can be informed of the association between CD and CMT before administrating manipulation of the cervical spine.[150] There is controversy regarding the degree of risk of stroke from cervical manipulation.[15] Many chiropractors state that, the association between chiropractic therapy and vertebral arterial dissection is not proven.[17] However, it has been suggested that the causality between chiropractic cervical manipulation beyond the normal range of motion and vascular accidents is probable[17] or definite.[16] There is very low evidence supporting a small association between internal carotid artery dissection and chiropractic neck manipulation.[151] The incidence of internal carotid artery dissection following cervical spine manipulation is unknown.[152] The literature infrequently reports helpful data to better understand the association between cervical manipulative therapy, cervical artery dissection and stroke.[153] The limited evidence is inconclusive that chiropractic spinal manipulation therapy is not a cause of intracranial hypotension.[154] Cervical intradural disc herniation is very rare following spinal manipulation therapy.[155]
The next step in the process was an X-ray. Having an X-ray done of your spine can help the chiropractor determine your treatment plan and can aid in the adjustment. That said, not all chiropractors will recommend an X-ray at your appointment. It turns out some chiropractors say that X-rays should be part of routine chiropractic care, while others argue X-rays aren't necessary for every patient. When researching potential chiropractors, feel free to ask if they recommend X-rays for all patients and how the X-rays can benefit your treatment plan.
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