In 2009, a backlash to the libel suit filed by the British Chiropractic Association (BCA) against Simon Singh, has inspired the filing of formal complaints of false advertising against more than 500 individual chiropractors within one 24-hour period,[199][200] prompting the McTimoney Chiropractic Association to write to its members advising them to remove leaflets that make claims about whiplash and colic from their practice, to be wary of new patients and telephone inquiries, and telling their members: "If you have a website, take it down NOW." and "Finally, we strongly suggest you do NOT discuss this with others, especially patients."[199] An editorial in Nature has suggested that the BCA may be trying to suppress debate and that this use of British libel law is a burden on the right to freedom of expression, which is protected by the European Convention on Human Rights.[201] The libel case ended with the BCA withdrawing its suit in 2010.[202][203]
Chiropractic is a health care profession that focuses on disorders of the musculoskeletal system and the nervous system, and the effects of these disorders on general health. Chiropractic services are used most often to treat neuromusculoskeletal complaints, including but not limited to back pain, neck pain, pain in the joints of the arms or legs, and headaches.

Chiropractors often argue that this education is as good as or better than medical physicians', but most chiropractic training is confined to classrooms with much time spent learning theory, adjustment, and marketing.[65] The fourth year of chiropractic education persistently showed the highest stress levels.[188] Every student, irrespective of year, experienced different ranges of stress when studying.[188] The chiropractic leaders and colleges have had internal struggles.[189] Rather than cooperation, there has been infighting between different factions.[189] A number of actions were posturing due to the confidential nature of the chiropractic colleges in an attempt to enroll students.[189][clarification needed]
Welcome to The Joint Chiropractic - Fayetteville! As your Fayetteville chiropractor dedicated to family chiropractic and spine health, we invite you to join the millions of Americans who have not only found relief from lower back pain, sciatica pain, and migraines, but also a pathway to wellness with chiropractic's natural, drug-free approach to healthcare.
A 2016 study Goertz contributed to showed that about 14 percent of people have seen a chiropractor in the last year. Of those with significant neck or back pain, 33 percent said chiropractic care was safest compared with 12 percent who say pain medications are safer (physical therapy was perceived as safest), according to Gallup data. Also, 29 percent say chiropractic care is more effective than pain medication for those who have neck or back pain, while 22 percent preferred medication over chiropractic care.

Mainstream health care and governmental organizations such as the World Health Organization consider chiropractic to be complementary and alternative medicine (CAM);[1] and a 2008 study reported that 31% of surveyed chiropractors categorized chiropractic as CAM, 27% as integrated medicine, and 12% as mainstream medicine.[56] Many chiropractors believe they are primary care providers,[4][21] including US[57] and UK chiropractors,[58] but the length, breadth, and depth of chiropractic clinical training do not support the requirements to be considered primary care providers,[2] so their role on primary care is limited and disputed.[2][21]

Early chiropractors believed that all disease was caused by interruptions in the flow of innate intelligence, a vitalistic nervous energy or life force that represented God's presence in man; chiropractic leaders often invoked religious imagery and moral traditions.[23] D.D. Palmer said he "received chiropractic from the other world".[24] D.D. and B.J. both seriously considered declaring chiropractic a religion, which might have provided legal protection under the U.S. constitution, but decided against it partly to avoid confusion with Christian Science.[23][216] Early chiropractors also tapped into the Populist movement, emphasizing craft, hard work, competition, and advertisement, aligning themselves with the common man against intellectuals and trusts, among which they included the American Medical Association (AMA).[23]
Neck injuries can occur during motor vehicle accidents, other traumatic events or sports. Symptoms of these injuries include neck stiffness, shoulder or arm pain, headache, facial pain and dizziness. Pain from a motor vehicle injury may be caused by tears in muscles or injuries to the joints between vertebrae. Other causes of pain are ligament rupture or damage to a disc. Conservative treatment of these injuries includes pain medication, bed rest, reduction of physical activity and physical therapy.

Check all that apply. Most people will not be able to check many of these! But the more you can check, the more worthwhile it is to ask your doctor if it’s possible that there’s something more serious going on than just neck pain. Most people who check off an item or two will turn out not to have an ominous health issue. But red flags are reasons to check… not reasons to worry.
Dr. Sheridan Jones is also a graduate of Northwestern Health Sciences University, finishing his Doctorate of Chiropractic degree in 2007. Before attending Northwestern, he was enrolled in Carroll College where he studied Biology and was a member of the Fighting Saints football team. He is a certified Titleist Performance Institute medical professional which focuses on the evaluation and treatment of golf related injuries and performance issues. Dr. Jones is also a certified Graston Technique provider that implements a unique, instrument assisted soft tissue therapy for muscular injuries and chronic conditions that are traditionally difficult to treat or have failed with other treatment options. He lives in Helena with his wife, Tara, and enjoys everything outdoors - especially football, golf, hunting, boating and skiing.
I’ve never really considered going to a chiropractor—I’m healthy, moderately active and I don’t really have much pain on a regular basis. But I work for a health and wellness company that encourages its employees to take an active role in their health, and many of my coworkers swear by their chiropractors. I wasn’t sure what a chiropractor could really do for me, but after a bit of word-of-mouth research, I found out that chiropractic care actually has benefits for your whole body! So I decided to give it a try.
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